ATO

ATO

ABOUT BRAND

www.ato.jp

Considering each body shape unique, Japanese brand ato continues to embrace such uniqueness through its fantastic collections. One of its best-sellers, the stoic slim and minimal tailored jacket, has also been favored by many stylists and editors.
“Japan has a long tradition of wearing kimonos and appreciates the beauty of layering. So I think many people still tend to avoid clothes that emphasise their body shape,” said ato designer Ato Matsumoto. “Skinny silhouettes have moved into mainstream now, but when I launched my brand in 1993, clothes were made to cover and hide the body.”

Striving to dispel the typical Japanese covered-up look, Matsumoto aims to do more than just designing body-conscious shapes. In order to accentuate the male or female body shape, he concentrates more on the silhouettes and intricate detailing – and this is one of the main reasons why ato attracts both men and women.

“Silhouettes change dramatically by carefully adjusting the pocket placements and waistline,” says Matsumoto. “A look can change easily with the use of alternative fabrics too, but I don’t like to rely on materials as much. I rather explore further possibilities by making small adjustments.”

“Consumers may find this hard to understand,” he continues. “But I would like people to think of this as our character. Heavily embellished, decorative garments maybe more obvious, but that just isn’t my style. I don’t feel the need to create exaggerated designs because I consider clothes as a tool to supports the wearers, not to outshine them.”
Matsumoto has been incorporating his strong brand identity into his designs since the brand launch, however, things haven’t been always easy.

“Ideally, I would like to offer more men’s-inspired and masculine designs for women. But most Japanese women opt for “kawaii” designs,” he says. “Cute designs wouldn’t be quite our style. But then it wouldn’t appeal if the designs were too masculine.”

Having had difficulty finding the common ground, Matsumoto decided to return to his roots, in a sense, and based his autumn/winter 2010/11 collection around the theme “unisex”. Using the same material, his collection demonstrated the creative boundaries between menswear and womenswear. “I was able to create different silhouettes from the same fabric because both body forms are completely different.”

Boosting energy from the gap between women’s needs and his desires, Matsumoto continues to explore new possibilities for womenswear. Very tough and challenging indeed.

Thank you for visiting.
May 04, 2013 YOHJI YAMAMOTO
Date — May 04, 2013
Air
SPRING-SUMMER 2013
YOHJI YAMAMOTO
JUNE 28, 2012PARIS
By Matthew Schneier
“Bruised defiance” would make a nice subtitle for aYohji Yamamoto autobiography. The designer, so instrumental to the rise of Japanese fashion in the 1980′s, has fallen out of the center of fashion’s conversation—and into bankruptcy and back—in recent years, but never given up the fight. Bruised defiance was certainly the look he courted tonight, when he sent out models with black eyes and cuts on their faces. On they soldiered, and so does he. But it was hard not to notice that, though the room was full, attendance among American editors was at an all-time low. (Retailers, for the record, were somewhat better represented.) Those absent missed a solid, likable show, the main message of which was volume: billowing, shortened pants, mostly, tied off at the bottom or gathered with elastic, complemented with two-button jackets or long, thin coats. The colors were unusually lovely, too, in combinations like salmon and orange, or salmon and creamy sky blue. Still, it felt like Yohji doing Yohji. A few more surprises might help to lure some of those editors back.
Date — May 02, 2013
Air
SPRING-SUMMER 2013
LAITINEN
Date — April 29, 2013
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SPRING-SUMMER 2013
WALTER VAN BEIRENDONCK
Date — March 08, 2013
Air
NEW ARRIVALS
COMME DES GARCONS TRICOT X SHIRT X BEATLES
Date — November 02, 2007
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AIR OPENING